Using Math Mats in Guided Math Groups: Part 2

Posted on January 12, 2011. Filed under: During the Guided Math Lesson, Graphic Organizers, Manipulatives, Math is a Language, Mathematical Proficiency | Tags: , , , , , |


When using Math Story Mats it is really important to have a focus in the guided math group.  Think about what types of stories you are focusing on in that particular session.  CGI provides excellent resources for understanding and teaching story types. As you use the math story mats, be aware of telling different types of stories.  There are four types of stories for addition and subtraction and 5 types for multiplication and division:

http://users.ntplx.net/~region10/regiontenmathpages/region10mathsitefaq/What%20is%20Cognitively%20Guided%20Instruction%5B1%5D.pdf

Tons of Story Type Question Prompts!

http://sddial.k12.sd.us/esa/grants/sdcounts/sdcounts10-11/cgi_problemtypes.pdf

It is important to practice these individual types with the students so they know how to solve them.  I would work on these story types with the mats one at a time and then I would start mixing them up.

***Be sure to search “Problem Solving” for other word problem/ problem solving posts in this blog!”

Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

 

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One Response to “Using Math Mats in Guided Math Groups: Part 2”

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When I first discovered your blog, I remember a post cautioning teachers about telling their students to look for certain words in a problem which indicated if they should add, subtract, muliply, or divide. Using the math mats and knowing the different types of stories would focus on the problem-solving rather than looking for certain words. Students would become familiar with all types of questions.


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