Multiplication Posters!

Posted on May 15, 2012. Filed under: Classroom environment, Common Core | Tags: , , , , |


Here are some ideas for multiplication posters.  Posters are thinking prompts for students.  They scaffold access into the content.  Do you have math scaffolds in your classroom?

Resource 1 

Resource 2 (scroll down for pictures)

Resource 3

Resource 4

Resource 5 (scroll down to the middle of page to see multiplication concept chart)

Roll 6

Roll 7

Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

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2 Responses to “Multiplication Posters!”

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Dr. Nicki,
I followed the link and saw two hands with five marbles as 2×5. I have been teaching my kids that 2×5 is counting by 2’s five times and that 5 counted twice would be shown as 5×2. I know it isn’t critical because of the commutative property, but I want to set my kids up for accurate understanding of the concept. Is my repeated addition is correct? Help!

Hi Lisa,

This is such an important issue. 2 x 5 actually means two groups of 5….remember that the “x” is read as “groups of” so this would mean 2 groups of 5. A good way to teach this is using circles and stars, where the students roll two different colored dice, one for circles and one for stars and then draw a picture and they write number sentences to represent what they have drawn. For example, say they roll 3 x 5 that would be 3 groups of 5. So the students would draw 3 circles with 5 stars in each circle. The addition sentence would be 5 + 5 + 5. The verbal statement is 3 groups of 5. The multiplication sentence is 3 x 5.
It does matter in that the commutative property represents the same amount but it is a different configuration. Think about it. If you say you have 3 groups of 5 people or 5 groups of 3 people, depending what you are doing, you need to know the difference. Give the students dinner table problems so they can think about what it looks like.
https://classroom.peoriaud.k12.az.us/sites/cpickard/Shared%20Documents/Parent%20Files/Math%20Homework/Unit%20F/Circles%20and%20Stars.pdf

http://www.neisd.net/curriculum/SchImprov/math/elem/2nd_new_web/circles_and_stars.pdf

Happy Mathing,
Dr. Nicki


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