Math Workstations: Component 1

Posted on May 20, 2013. Filed under: Assessment, Common Core, Differentiated Instruction, Mathematical Proficiency | Tags: , , , |


Math workstations first and foremost are data-driven. Data is collected at many different times throughout the year and in many different forms.

Data Collection Opportunities and Formats:
Beginning of the year Benchmark Data (Beginning of the year data that assesses what children have learned in prior years AND retained).
This is especially important in terms of determining fluency and word problem levels, as well as general knowledge.

Mid-year Benchmark Data  (Assesses mid-year learning)

End of the year Benchmark Data (Assess what has been learned during the year)

Pre-Assessment of Upcoming Chapter (Especially important to determine the skills in that particular domain from prior grades…it gives you a starting point and a marker for what you are going to build upon. Also in the pre-assessment you want to check what will be taught in the chapter to see if some students already know it so you can better differentiate the instruction).

Guided Math Notes (What is happening in the guided math group?  What have you noticed?  What are the areas of strength and the areas of challenge?)

Conference Notes (What are the students personal learning goals? What goals have you set together?)

Chapter Quizzes (In progress monitors)

Entrance/Exit Slips (These give great in the moment information)

Math Thinking Notebook Work (What kind of work is the student doing?)

Math Workstation Artifacts (Recording sheets at math workstations.  What does the work show?)

Chapter Assessment (Did the student learn the math taught in the chapter? What is the student’s strengths and challenges?)

You should also have an articulated plan for assessing fluency and word problem levels periodically throughout the year.

Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

 

 

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: