Archive for March, 2019

Part Part Whole Problems k/1 Videos

Posted on March 28, 2019. Filed under: Uncategorized |


I have uploaded the k/1 Part Part Whole Videos- Whole Unknown. There are three types of Part/Part Whole Problems (see Figure 6.1). The first is a problem where the whole is unknown. For example, The toy store had 4 big marbles and 5 small marbles. How many marbles do they have altogether? Another example, John had $97 in his bank account and $8 in his piggy bank. How much money does he have altogether? We know both parts and the task is to figure out the whole.

The second kind of problem is a problem where one of the parts is unknown. For example, The toy store had 100 marbles. There were 89 small marbles. The rest of the marbles were large. How many large marbles did they have? Another example, Kelly had $10. She had $5 in her piggy bank and the rest in her bank account. How much does she have in her bank account? In this type of problem, we are given the whole and one of the parts. The task is to figure out the other part.

The third type of problem is a Both Addends Unknown problem. In this type of problem both addends are not known, only the total is given. For example, Jane has 25 cents. Name all the possible coin combinations that she could have. The task is to figure out all of the possible combinations.

Kindergarten students start working with part part whole whole unknown and both addends unknown in many state standards and then by 1st they learn part part whole part unknown.  All the other grades work with these problem types, using multi-digit numbers, fractions and decimals.

Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

Resources: https://padlet.com/drnicki7/165m3bx7nqvm

Get the book! https://www.routledge.com/Math-Problem-Solving-in-Action-Getting-Students-to-Love-Word-Problems/Newton/p/book/9781138054530

Take the course:  Problem Solving in Action k-2 https://drnickinewton.thinkific.com/

 

 

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Word Problem Sorts

Posted on March 20, 2019. Filed under: Uncategorized |


 

In this workstation, the students sort the word problem by category.  This station helps students to reason about the type of problem they are solving.  It is very important that students understand and can explain the situation.  Although they might use an inverse operation or another strategy to solve the problem, they need to understand the problem situation.  For example, I might solve repeated addition to solve a multiplication problem but that doesn’t change the problem type.  The strategy to solve the problem might have been repeated addition but the problem is a multiplication one.

Examples of sorts:

Join/Take From

Part Part Whole Whole Unknown/Part Part whole Part Unknown

Compare difference/compare bigger part unknown/compare smaller part unknown

Equal Group/Arrays

Number of Groups/ Number in Groups

 

 

Example:

Word Problem Sort
Multiplication Division
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

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Using Graphic Organizers to Write a Word Problem

Posted on March 13, 2019. Filed under: Uncategorized |


 

Graphic organizers can help students to write word problems. Pick a type of word problem type to work on, for example a division equal group problem, depending on the grade. Then on the board, do a group graphic organizer of all the elements of the word problem.

Setting Group The thing in each group What do you know?
Playground

Classroom

Cafeteria

Auditorium

Bus

Swings/Slides

Tables

Lines

Seats

Students

Teachers

 

How many groups? Or

How many are in each group?

 

Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

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Story Strips: Launching Word Problem Talks

Posted on March 9, 2019. Filed under: Uncategorized |


Welcome to Story Strips.

Hello!  This is Dr. Nicki. I created story strips because so often kindergarten and first grade teachers tell me that their students can’t read the problems!  Well, here is one way to get students telling and solving word problems! These are great for students to use as word  problem launches. Often times, students have trouble telling stories, but with story strips they can just start telling stories.  When they see the strips they intuitively understand what is happening.  Here are a few ways to use them.

Whole group: Show a Story Strip and have the students discuss the problem that they could tell. They should think about how to model the problem in different ways.

Guided Math Groups: The teacher models a few with the group. Each student gets their own strip and they tell the story to the group and solve it.  They have to prove their thinking in more than one way.

Math Workstations: Teachers can assign a specific set of problems for students to work with or it can be free choice.

***Story strips can be made with pictures, stickers and sketches!

Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

P.S. I have been sharing this with teachers around the country and they and their kids are loving it! Start today!

Stay in touch: https://padlet.com/drnicki7/165m3bx7nqvm (347) 688-4927) drnicki7@gmail.com https://www.pinterest.com/drnicki7/word-problems/

Check out our problems solving courses: https://drnickinewton.thinkific.com/collections

Get the books:

 Story Strips

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Problem Solving Powerpoints: Compare Problems

Posted on March 7, 2019. Filed under: Uncategorized |


Here you go!  Be sure to check out the power point resources for Compare problems on the padlet!  https://padlet.com/drnicki7/165m3bx7nqvm

Compare stories are the most difficult types of stories to tell. There are three types of comparison stories. The first type of comparison story is where two different things are being compared. For example,  Lucy had 5 rings and Maria had 7 rings.  Who had more?  How many more? Or, How many fewer rings does Lucy have than Maria?  In a difference problem, when you say fewer, it is considered a more difficult version of the problem. There is another version of the compare the difference problem. For example, Jean has 20 marbles and Mike has 10. How many more marbles does Mike need to have the same amount as Jean?

The second type of comparison story is where the bigger part is unknown. In this type of story, we are looking for the bigger amount. For example, Luke had $57 and Marcos had $19 more than Luke. How much does Marcos have? How much do they have altogether? Another example, Luke had $57. This is $10 less than Marcos. How much does Marcos have? There are two types of this problem. When you say less and you are looking for more, it is considered the harder part because it is counterintuitive. The task is to find the bigger part.

The third type of comparison story is where the smaller part is unknown. In this type of story, we are looking for the smaller amount. For example, Luke had $57 and Marcos had $10 less than Luke. How much does Marcos have? How much do they have altogether? Another example, Luke had $57. This is $10 more than Marcos. How much does Marcos have? There are two types of this problem. When you say more and you are looking for the smaller part, it is considered the harder version because it is counterintuitive. The task is to find the smaller part.

Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

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Problem Solving Videos

Posted on March 6, 2019. Filed under: Uncategorized |


I have uploaded the word problem join result unknown videos.  These are just fun to watch.   Pop them out and watch them full screen.  Then pause the video so the students can use their problem solving mats to figure out the solution and then continue on to see the answer.  Or have the students watch the videos and then prove that the answer is correct using 2 different models.

Videos are done by Elena Ruyter.

Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

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Problem Solving Join Stories k-2

Posted on March 3, 2019. Filed under: Uncategorized |


Here are the Join Power points.  These are great to make sure that you are teaching all the different types.  Remember that k works on join result unknown, 1st and 2nd work on that and change unknown and 2nd focuses on all of them including start unknown. In kindergarten students work on word problems within 10 and 1st grade within 20 and 2nd within 100.  The problem types don’t change but the number ranges do.

Have a template for students to work out the word problems on as they are thinking about them. (see attached for an example).  Problem Solving Mat 1

Get power point here: https://padlet.com/drnicki7/165m3bx7nqvm

Happy Mathing,

Dr. Nicki

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